People Like Us

April 17, 2012

Review by:
Leah Koerner

School:
New York Film Academy LA 2011

Quote:
"If you're not a part of the freaks, you're a part of the boredom." - Perry Farrell


If there’s one thing on Earth I really can’t stand, it’s terrible movies with great actors in them. People Like Us is one of those movies.

This movie had me fooled for the first five minutes. Our cocky protagonist Sam (Chris Pine) was schmoozing his way in and out of deals at work. Chris Pine reminded me a lot of Tom Cruise in Jerry Maguire. Then his boss threatened to fire him, he went home, and his fiancé Hannah (Olivia Wilde) told him his dad was dead. Sam responded with “What’s for dinner?” By that point I knew I’d just be sitting through pure crap for at least another hour and ten minutes.

The general idea behind this movie was fine; the execution, however, was deplorable. Sam inherits his estranged father’s money, but there’s a note on it saying it must be delivered to a woman and her son. It turns out the woman is actually his sister Frankie (Elizabeth Banks) he never knew existed. The entire movie is about Sam deciding whether or not to keep the money or give it to his long-lost sister he’s only just met.

This entire movie felt like a made for TV Lifetime movie with an excessive budget and actual movie stars. There were at least five character monologues complete with melodramatic guitar music playing in the background, writing on par with fan fiction written by teenagers, and a lot of really drawn out scenes. A lot of staring. A lot of watching the actors holding their emotion, waiting to hear “cut.”

Sam and Frankie’s relationship was cringe-inducing. Sam didn’t just go right the hell up to Frankie and say “I’m your brother.” Oh no. He pretended to be a member of Frankie’s Alcoholics Anonymous group and got to know her, followed her and her troubled son Josh (Michael Hall D’Addario) around for weeks before telling them who he was. There were a bunch of times where Frankie was totally checking out Sam, it was killing me. Only when she tried to kiss him and ask him to move in with her did he tell her he was actually her brother. Puke!

Everything was too drawn out. Every emotion felt by a character in this movie was made crystal clear, then it was spelled out for you, then it was thrown in your face. I don’t tolerate people throwing stuff at my face in real life so I certainly don’t tolerate it when I watch a movie. So by the time you were supposed to be crying at all the touching moments, you were probably laughing. If you like sentimental, poorly written movies, then by all means, watch People Like Us. If not, then I suggest not touching this movie with a thirty-nine and a half foot pole.

Synopsis:

A man is tasked with delivering $150,000 of his deceased father’s fortune to the sister he has never met.

MORE COOL STORIES FROM AROUND THE WEB

ZergNet

About The Author

"If you're not a part of the freaks, you're a part of the boredom." - Perry Farrell

Leave a Reply